Toyota president's son still veiled in secrecy

Updated : 08.09.2016 / Category Capsule

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Toyota Motor Corp. President Akio Toyoda's son, Daisuke, is already being tipped to eventually follow in his father's footsteps, yet very little is known publicly about the young man who could one day take over the wheel at the major Japanese automaker.

Aged in his late 20s, Daisuke graduated from Keio University and then continued his studies at a university in Boston until 2014. At the end of that year, there were whispers he had landed a job at Denso Corp., a major auto parts manufacturer affiliated with Toyota, but this was never officially confirmed. But there is a widespread view that Daisuke has already started working for Toyota.

Daisuke has popped up in public from time to time. In April this year, he competed, under his own name, in a rally event sponsored by Toyota's racing team in Kiso, Nagano Prefecture. With well-known female driver Sayaka Adachi as his navigator, Daisuke completed the course in 25th place out of 66 drivers (but last in his class). Sentaku also has confirmed Daisuke accompanied his father on a rally car driver training camp held in Hiroshima in August.

Akio is known as a car aficionado who has even entered races under the pseudonym "Morizo." It seems Daisuke also has a love of cars in his blood.

Akio, who also graduated from Keio and studied in the United States, joined Toyota at age 27 following a stint working at a U.S. investment management company. Around that time, he married Yuko, the daughter of former Mitsui & Co. Vice President Mamoru Tabuchi. Daisuke has probably already reached this age.

If the son of this distinguished family seriously intends to carry on the family business, perhaps it is about time he revealed his plans, rather than being preoccupied with rally races and staying out of the limelight.

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This is a translation of an article from the September 2016 issue of Sentaku. The original article can be found here.